14th August 2007

Turning American Soldiers into Crusaders?

Religious IconsIt’s not bad enough that we’re losing precious American lives daily in a war that started out as a personal vendetta by Bush(W) to prove to Bush(Sr.) that he could take out the man his daddy didn’t, now our Department of Defense is allowing an evangelical extremist group that poses as an “entertainment troupe” to turn the war in Iraq into a religious crusade?!?

This Article posted at The Nation, about plans by Operation Stand Up (OSU) “to mail copies of the controversial apocalyptic video game, Left Behind: Eternal Forces to soldiers serving in Iraq” and quotes the group as saying “”We feel the forces of heaven have encouraged us to perform multiple crusades that will sweep through this war torn region,” OSU declares on its website about its planned trip to Iraq. “We’ll hold the only religious crusade of its size in the dangerous land of Iraq.” I won’t even give the fools at OSU the courtesy of a link to their site but I’m sure it won’t be hard to find with all the press they are getting, if you’re interested in reading more of their narrow-minded malarkey.

Every American who loves our Constitution and the principles of freedom of religion that it was founded upon should be up in arms over this – and writing their State Representatives, Senators, Congressmen (and Congresswomen) and anyone who will listen and put a halt to this nonsense. There’s a reason that we are supposed to have a separation of Church and State, which is to keep any single religious organization from controlling the representation of all citizens, who may or may not agree with that organization’s particular point of view.

Not everyone in this country is a Christian, and even many who are won’t want our nation’s military used in what could appear to be a religious crusade in a region that is already highly unstable, and where we have few allies and many enemies. Even if the majority of our soldiers don’t share these “entertainment gifts” with the locals in Iraq, our country will still most assuredly be perceived as proselytizing, which is highly offensive to most Muslims. A move like OSU is planning can only bring more danger, not just to our soldiers over there, but here at home as well, as the resulting escalated anger of religious extremists in Muslim countries gets focused in our direction.

Hurry up and colonize the Moon, will ya’ NASA?? Then we can send all the extremists from every religion up there and just let them duke it out. The rest of us reasonable, open-minded folks can stay here and solve the climate crisis.

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2 comments:

  1. Jason, August 15, 2007, 8:21 pm

    It’s not an “article.” It’s a blog entry, and a very dishonest one at that. Even the Anti-Defamation League – no friend to evangelical Christians – agrees that “convert or kill” is not a part of the game.

     
  2. Trisha, August 15, 2007, 9:54 pm

    Hi Jason – thanks for commenting – I welcome all opinions, even dissenting ones.

    You may be completely correct – I have not played the game myself, nor do I intend to, but I welcome the opinions of anyone who has played it. However, I have heard that it does have quite a bit of violence involved (as do many secular games), and that the primary point of the game is to convert non-believers.

    I do not take issue with anyone of faith attempting to spread their word in an appropriate setting using appropriate behavior, logic, and rational arguments.

    I do take issue with those that would use an arm of our government, which is supposed to be secular at best, and non-denominational at worst, to spread the word of only one faith, since our government is supposed to represent all of us, of all faiths, including atheists.

    So that’s what has me upset – not the violence, but the extraordinary length over which the line between Church and State has been crossed.